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Live in such a way that if someone spoke badly of you, no one would believe it.

Unknown (via an-artful-life)

wow

(via worshipgifs)

clioancientart:

Gold body chain from the Hoxne Treaure, buried in the 5th century AD. Found at Hoxne, Suffolk, UK in 1992.
The Hoxne (pronounced ‘Hoxon’) hoard is a rich find of treasure from Roman Britain. Alongside approximately 15,000 coins were many other precious objects, buried for safety at a time when Britain was passing out of Roman control. The body-chain is a type of ornament which had a long history and can be seen in representations in both Hellenistic and Roman art but actual examples are extremely rare. The chains passed over the shoulders and under the arms of the wearer, with a decorative focus where they join on the chest and the back. This example is very small and could only have been worn by a slender, perhaps very young, woman. The 2 plaques where the chains join comprise a gold coin of Emperor Gratian (AD 367-383) in a decorative mount, and an oval setting for 9 gems, a central amethyst, 4 garnets, and 4 empty round settings which probably contained pearls, now completely decayed. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

clioancientart:

Gold body chain from the Hoxne Treaure, buried in the 5th century AD.
Found at Hoxne, Suffolk, UK in 1992.

The Hoxne (pronounced ‘Hoxon’) hoard is a rich find of treasure from Roman Britain. Alongside approximately 15,000 coins were many other precious objects, buried for safety at a time when Britain was passing out of Roman control. The body-chain is a type of ornament which had a long history and can be seen in representations in both Hellenistic and Roman art but actual examples are extremely rare. The chains passed over the shoulders and under the arms of the wearer, with a decorative focus where they join on the chest and the back. This example is very small and could only have been worn by a slender, perhaps very young, woman. The 2 plaques where the chains join comprise a gold coin of Emperor Gratian (AD 367-383) in a decorative mount, and an oval setting for 9 gems, a central amethyst, 4 garnets, and 4 empty round settings which probably contained pearls, now completely decayed. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

omgthatdress:

Robe à l’Anglaise
1783
The Philadelphia Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Robe à l’Anglaise

1783

The Philadelphia Museum of Art

I really miss art school.

Marla’s philosophy of life was that she might die at any moment. The tragedy, she said, was that she didn’t.
Fight Club (via mourningmelody)

browngirlanonymous:

St. Augustine 2014

Spending time with God is the key to our strength and success in all areas of life. Be sure that you never try to work God into your schedule, but always work your schedule around Him.
― Joyce Meyer (via psych-quotes)

stannisbaratheon:

@WorstMuse is a relic of the human race

As Arnold points out, there is an otherwise inexplicable shift in direction in the Piccadilly line passing east out of South Kensington. “In fact,” she writes, “the tunnel curves between Knightsbridge and South Kensington stations because it was impossible to drill through the mass of skeletal remains buried in Hyde Park.” I will admit that I think she means “between Knightsbridge and Hyde Park Corner”—although there is apparently a “small plague pit dating from around 1664” beneath Knightsbridge Green—but I will defer to Arnold’s research.

But to put that another way, the ground was so solidly packed with the interlocked skeletons of 17th-century victims of the Great Plague that the Tube’s 19th-century excavation teams couldn’t even hack their way through them all. The Tube thus had to swerve to the side along a subterranean detour in order to avoid this huge congested knot of skulls, ribs, legs, and arms tangled in the soil—an artificial geology made of people, caught in the throat of greater London.